100 years ago in Kansas, August, 1918:

August 6, 1918.

-The Rev. Manasse Bontrager, Dodge City, was fined $500 for writing an article criticizing the Liberty bond campaign.  The Mennonite Weekly, Sugar Creek, Ohio, was fined the same amount for publishing the article.

August 12, 1918.

-The K.S.A.C. offered a farm tractor course.

August 14, 1918.

-At K.S.A.C. over 100 agricultural experts began a week-long course in methods of increasing production.

August 16, 1918.

-The Attorney General said that enemy aliens should not be permitted to vote and filed two suits to test the matter.

-Kansas sales of war savings stamps totaled $7,420,305.

August 20, 1918.

-Kansas was allotted $1,250,000 for seed wheat loans, limited to $3 an acre and $300 to any one farmer.

August 23, 1918.

-The Federal Food Administrator asked farmers not to burn strawstacks as straw was needed for feed.

August 24, 1918.

-Lt. Donald Hudson, native Topekan, became the Air Corps’ fifth ace when he shot down his sixth German plane.  (See the previous story:  https://www.kansasww1.org/aviators-donald-hudson/ )

August 28, 1918.

-Due to sugar rationing, Kansans were making sorghum molasses again.  In 1918 over 869,000 acres of cane were planted.

August 31, 1918.

-Fred Burns, general manager of the Consolidated Flour Mills Co., Hutchinson, was fined $1,000 for violation of flour-saving rules.

Blair Tarr is the Museum Curator of the Kansas State Historical Society. He oversees the three-dimensional collections of the Society, but has special interests in the Civil War, Wichita-made Valentine diners, and Leavenworth's Abernathy Furniture. In the last few years he has also done a lot of cramming on The Great War. He is a past president of the Kansas Museums Association and the Civil War Round Tables of both Kansas City and Eastern Kansas. He is currently a board member of the Heritage League of Greater Kansas City.