Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

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Annual National World War I Museum and Memorial Symposium

It’s coming close to the time for the National World War I Museum and Memorial’s annual symposium! Scheduled for November 1-2, it promises to be another excellent program. This year’s topic: 1919: Peace?

For more information, use this link: https://www.theworldwar.org/learn/2019-symposium ...read more

C-SPAN3, September 21-23

After an absence of a few weeks, we have some programs from the World War I era appearing on C-SPAN3 this weekend. As usual, all times shown here are Central.

Reel America: “Motor Convoy” 1919 Silent Army Film. The post-war cross-country convoy which included Lt. Colonel Dwight Eisenhower, the trip that inspired the creation of the Interstate Highway System in the 1950s. Airs Saturday, September 21 at 9:00 p.m. Repeats Sunday, September 22 at 3:00 p.m., and Monday, September 23 at 1:00 a.m. and 6:15 a.m. ...read more

Pip, Squeak and Wilfred

Pip, Squeak and Wilfred were cartoon characters in a wildly successful comic strip of the same name that ran in the British tabloid The Daily Mirror from 1919 to 1940 and again from 1947 to 1955. Originally the work of story writer Bertram J. Lamb (1887-1938) and illustrator Austin B. Payne (1876-1959), this imaginative work featured the dog Pip, the South African penguin Squeak and the juvenile long-eared rabbit Wilfred. ...read more

Til the Boys Come Home

This was the last line of the chorus of the 1914 British hit song  Keep the Home Fires Burning, with the music  written by Welsh-born Ivor Novello (1893 – 1951) and the tear-jerking lyrics by American Lena Guilbert Ford (1870 – 1918).  World War 1 connections:  In 1916 Novello joined the Royal Naval Air Service, where he washed out of pilot training after crashing two aircraft, and during the night of March 7th, 1918, Mrs. Ford and her son Walter were the first American civilians to be killed in a German air raid. ...read more

The Centennial of The American Legion

The American Legion was formed March 15th, 1919 at a meeting held in Paris, with the stated mission of providing advocacy and services to the veterans of World War 1, similar to the Civil War organizations the Grand Army of the Republic and the United Confederate Veterans. The Legion was chartered by Congress on Sept. 16th, 1919, (U.S. Code, Title 36, Chapters 41-50). ...read more

The Nobel Prizes and World War 1

On December 10th, 1920, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson was awarded the 1919 Nobel Peace Prize, in recognition of his effort to create The League of Nations. This was a rare late award, permitted under the rules but not previously done. The reason for the delay was that some of the committee were reluctant because the U.S. Senate had failed to ratify the Treaty of Versailles in November, 1919. ...read more

New WW1 Movie: 1917

This major motion picture will be released soon. Directed by Sam Mendes and produced by Steven Spielberg’s Amblin Partners, it features George McKay, Dean-Charles Chapman, Benedict Cumberbatch, Colin Firth, Mark Strong and Richard Madden. You can read more about this and view the trailer here. ...read more

Hiawatha Honors Homer White

Recently Hiawatha, Kansas, honored World War I hometown soldier Homer White, for whom the American Legion post is named. The National World War I Centennial Committee posted the story on their website. Here’s the link:

https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/6519-veterans-mark-wwi-milestone-in-hiawatha-ks.html?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery ...read more

Erwin Bleckley and the Lost Battalion

Episode #135 of the WWI Centennial News Podcast includes a story about Erwin Bleckley, the WWI flyer from Wichita who lost his life and received the Medal of Honor. See the link below; the Bleckley story starts at 8:05:

https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call.html?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery ...read more

The Reparations Story

The 1919 Versailles Treaty required the payment of reparations to most of the Allied Powers for causing the war.  No payments were to be made to Russia, who wasn’t represented at the conference, and the U.S.  which refused to receive reparations or territorial concessions. The burden fell mostly on Germany, in an amount equivalent to $269 billion today. Cash reparations assessed to Austria, Hungary and Turkey were zeroed out due to their large territorial losses. Bulgaria paid about $1.4 billion in today’s money before their debt was cancelled in 1932.   ...read more

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