Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

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American Philanthropy and World War 1

The National World War One Museum and Memorial in Kansas City has just opened this on-line exhibit. You can access it here.

WW1 Home Movies

Home movies began in 1923 when Eastman Kodak offered the 16 mm film. One could buy a kit of a camera, projector, tripod, screen and splicer for $335 (about $5,000 in today’s money). This Youtube clip was prepared by The National Archives from 16 mm movies sold for home use by The Empire Safety Film Co. The 16 mm film was called ‘safety film’ because it was made from cellulose diacetate rather than the highly flammable cellulose nitrate used in the theater product. ...read more

Sinking of the German Fleet – and you can own a piece of it

Scapa Flow June 1919

After the Armistice, the German High Seas Fleet was assembled under British control at Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands pending disposition of the ships as war prizes. One hundred years ago today, by secret order from the ranking German officer on the scene, Konteradmiral Ludwig von Reuter (1869-1943), seventy-four of them were scuttled. Read the full story here. ...read more

WWI Museum Educators’ Newsletters

We have tried to alert our faithful readers about the Educators’ Newsletters put out by the National World War I Museum and Memorial on a regular basis. We need to catch up; here are the two most recent issues:

Issue 18: Reconstruction and American Philanthropy

See the link: http://wfly.co/u2W6V

Issue 19: Medal of Honor Recipients and Genealogy

See the link: http://wfly.co/Fn3g1 ...read more

WW1 and the Morgan Silver Dollar

Back in the 1950’s I was interested in coin collecting. In those oh-so bygone days before President Lyndon Johnson’s administration all U.S. coins of value higher than the nickel were made of .90 fine silver.  As a kid, the only coins that I could afford to collect were dimes, but I remember others lamenting about the shortage of dollar coins. At the time I didn’t know that this shortage was yet another result of World War One. ...read more

“Answering the Call: A World War I Exhibit”

Better late than never to report this. The Lyon County Historical Society in Emporia has had a World War I exhibit since last November, and it’s scheduled to close this summer.

For more information, see the article: http://www.emporiagazette.com/area_news/article_479597c8-a0d1-55c9-b5ef-899e15361d47.html ...read more

C-SPAN3, June 16th

Two WWI Programs on C-SPAN3 early Sunday morning, and it’s a repeat of last week. As usual, times are Central.

World War I U.S. Railroad Operations. Airs early Sunday morning June 16th at 3:25 a.m.

History Bookshelf: Ann Hagedorn, “Savage Peace.” Airs at 6:15 a.m Sunday morning, June 16th. ...read more

Pershing Park Memorial Inscriptions Announced

In August, 2017 I posted that the U.S. World War 1 Centennial Commission was seeking ideas for suitable inscriptions on the reverse side of the proposed memorial in Pershing Park. You can read that article by clicking here.

U.S.M.C. officers. Williams is on the right.

My personal favorite quote is “Retreat? Hell, we just got here.” – Capt. Lloyd Williams, 51st Co. 5th Marines, on June 2nd 1918 at Belleau Wood. Nine days later Williams was killed in the same action. You can read all about Capt. Williams here. ...read more

138th Infantry Homecoming

The 138th Infantry ’St. Louis’s Own’ (Missouri National Guard) paraded in its home city on May 9th 1919. You can read about this here.

The Sgt. York Site Controversy Continues

In my post of October 12th last I covered the story of Sgt. Alvin York. You can read the article here.

The controversy about the actual site where York engaged the Germans is between a group called ‘The Sgt. York Discovery Expedition’, which was led by newly-elected Pennsylvania State Senator and U.S. Army Col. (Ret.) Douglas Mastriano, and ‘The Sgt. York Project’ led by Thomas Nolan Ph.D. from Middle Tennessee State University. ...read more

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