Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

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Pip, Squeak and Wilfred

Pip, Squeak and Wilfred were cartoon characters in a wildly successful comic strip of the same name that ran in the British tabloid The Daily Mirror from 1919 to 1940 and again from 1947 to 1955. Originally the work of story writer Bertram J. Lamb (1887-1938) and illustrator Austin B. Payne (1876-1959), this imaginative work featured the dog Pip, the South African penguin Squeak and the juvenile long-eared rabbit Wilfred. ...read more

The Nobel Prizes and World War 1

On December 10th, 1920, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson was awarded the 1919 Nobel Peace Prize, in recognition of his effort to create The League of Nations. This was a rare late award, permitted under the rules but not previously done. The reason for the delay was that some of the committee were reluctant because the U.S. Senate had failed to ratify the Treaty of Versailles in November, 1919. ...read more

Camouflage Comes of Age in WW1

French Infantryman 1914

In 1914 the European armies went to war in what amounted to parade uniforms. In some cases, it was felt that brightly colored uniforms would help soldiers to recognize their comrades when in battle. After heavy casualties the armies hurried to introduce field uniforms that gave the soldiers some protection from becoming targets. ...read more

From Vira Whitehouse to Vera Brittain

Vera Brittain VAD

Vera Brittain (1893 – 1970) was born to a middle class family and was unusually well-educated for a woman of her time. In 1915 she left her Oxford studies and joined the Voluntary Aid Detachments (known as the VAD’s), an auxiliary whose members assisted nurses in wartime hospitals.  After postings to England and Malta, she was sent to General Hospital No. 24 in Etaples, France, where she served from August 3rd, 1917 to April 29th, 1918. You can read more about Vera, her brother Edward and her friends here. ...read more

The Only Operating FT-17 tank

Of the 70 or so Renault FT-17 tanks still in existence, one is in running condition. This machine is at The Museum of the American G.I., which is located near College Station, TX. Click here to see a clip of the FT-17 in operation.

For a complete history of the Renault FT-17 tank, click here. ...read more

Butchers and Blunderers

In the years following the First World War, terms like the above title were frequently used to describe the military leadership. To many it still seems such an obvious question: with so many failed offensives with horrendous casualties, why didn’t the man in charge get the sack? Well, some did. Here’s a list. ...read more

Phonetic Alphabets

US Army Model A telephone

In the Great War, the unprecedented and widespread use of telephones and rudimentary radio telephone transmitters for command and control brought forth the problem of misunderstanding what the person on the other end was trying to yell into his primitive device, especially during the noise and confusion of combat, and thus led to the practice of spelling out words and substituting codes for letters of the alphabet. This continues to the present day, although the code set has changed several times, and the current version was first promulgated in 1956. Here’s the 1914-18 table: ...read more

WW1 Memorials in Germany and Hungary

Click here to go to a fascinating annotated collection of photographs of German war memorials that were taken between February 2014 and December 2017 by Russian documentary photographer Vova Pomortzeff, who has searched throughout the country. To date he has photographed 114 monuments to fallen German soldiers, mostly from WW1 (some are for both wars), 75 of which are shown herein, and the project is continuing. The final version will be published in 2020. ...read more

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