Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Category: Research & Histories (page 1 of 63)

Michiline Resco Pershing

Gen. John J. Pershing (1860-1948) was the consummate professional soldier – utterly dedicated to duty. He didn’t marry until his forty-fifth year, to Helen “Frankie” Warren (1880-1915), the only daughter of the wealthy and prominent Sen. Francis Warren of Wyoming. The Pershings had four children in the space of six years, all while Pershing’s career took the family to Japan and the Philippines. Back in the U.S. they settled at The Presidio of San Francisco. Pershing was sent off to temporary duty at the Mexican border, leaving the family at The Presidio, where Helen and their three daughters died in a fire at their residence. Surviving was six year old Francis Warren Pershing (1909-1980). ...read more

The Six-Star General?

In the middle of one lonely night in 1970 when I had the duty at headquarters I answered a telephone call from an off-post bar. It seemed that there was a hot controversy going about whether there was such a rank as a six-star general. I knew that Pershing had been promoted to a higher rank than General but I didn’t know what the insignia was so I wasn’t able to be the tie-breaker. What follows is the whole story about ‘six-star’ generals. Judge for yourself what I should have said. ...read more

C-SPAN3, October 5 – 8

This weekend C-SPAN3 repeats programs from previous weeks. Of course, they can also be watched online at the C-SPAN website. all times are Central if you are watching as regularly scheduled programs.

The Presidency: Herbert Hoover & Aid to Famine-Stricken Russia. Airs at 11:05 a.m. Saturday morning, October 5. Repeats at 7:43 p.m. and 11:43 p.m. Tuesday evening, October 8. ...read more

The Big Red One Comes Home

One hundred years ago (plus a few days) the 1st Infantry Division disembarked in New York, the last of the American Expeditionary Force’s fighting units to return. You can read more about the Big Red One by clicking here or here.

The 1st Division were literally the first infantry to arrive in France in June of 1917 and the last ones to leave. However, the 28,000 or so men that returned home was a substantially different group – the 1st had lost 6,020 dead or missing and 17,201 had been wounded. ...read more

C-SPAN3, September 28 – 30

This weekend C-SPAN3 repeats WWI programming from last week, with two additions. All times as usual are Central.

Reel America “Motor Convoy” 1919 Silent Film. Airs at 7:00 a.m. Saturday morning, September 28.

The Presidency Herbert Hoover’s World War I Relief Work. Airs at 11:00 a.m. Saturday morning, September 28. ...read more

C-SPAN3, September 21-23

After an absence of a few weeks, we have some programs from the World War I era appearing on C-SPAN3 this weekend. As usual, all times shown here are Central.

Reel America: “Motor Convoy” 1919 Silent Army Film. The post-war cross-country convoy which included Lt. Colonel Dwight Eisenhower, the trip that inspired the creation of the Interstate Highway System in the 1950s. Airs Saturday, September 21 at 9:00 p.m. Repeats Sunday, September 22 at 3:00 p.m., and Monday, September 23 at 1:00 a.m. and 6:15 a.m. ...read more

Pip, Squeak and Wilfred

Pip, Squeak and Wilfred were cartoon characters in a wildly successful comic strip of the same name that ran in the British tabloid The Daily Mirror from 1919 to 1940 and again from 1947 to 1955. Originally the work of story writer Bertram J. Lamb (1887-1938) and illustrator Austin B. Payne (1876-1959), this imaginative work featured the dog Pip, the South African penguin Squeak and the juvenile long-eared rabbit Wilfred. ...read more

Til the Boys Come Home

This was the last line of the chorus of the 1914 British hit song  Keep the Home Fires Burning, with the music  written by Welsh-born Ivor Novello (1893 – 1951) and the tear-jerking lyrics by American Lena Guilbert Ford (1870 – 1918).  World War 1 connections:  In 1916 Novello joined the Royal Naval Air Service, where he washed out of pilot training after crashing two aircraft, and during the night of March 7th, 1918, Mrs. Ford and her son Walter were the first American civilians to be killed in a German air raid. ...read more

The Nobel Prizes and World War 1

On December 10th, 1920, U.S. President Woodrow Wilson was awarded the 1919 Nobel Peace Prize, in recognition of his effort to create The League of Nations. This was a rare late award, permitted under the rules but not previously done. The reason for the delay was that some of the committee were reluctant because the U.S. Senate had failed to ratify the Treaty of Versailles in November, 1919. ...read more

Hiawatha Honors Homer White

Recently Hiawatha, Kansas, honored World War I hometown soldier Homer White, for whom the American Legion post is named. The National World War I Centennial Committee posted the story on their website. Here’s the link:

https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/6519-veterans-mark-wwi-milestone-in-hiawatha-ks.html?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery ...read more

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