Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Category: Monuments & Memorials (page 1 of 15)

CFA finally approves the National WW1 Memorial design

On September 9th the District of Columbia Commission for Fine Arts signed off on the Pershing Park project. The next step is to get approval from the National Capitol Planning Commission. It is still hoped that the project can be completed by November 11th, 2020. If you’re interested in reading through the final version of the design click here. ...read more

Sinking of the German Fleet – and you can own a piece of it

Scapa Flow June 1919

After the Armistice, the German High Seas Fleet was assembled under British control at Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands pending disposition of the ships as war prizes. One hundred years ago today, by secret order from the ranking German officer on the scene, Konteradmiral Ludwig von Reuter (1869-1943), seventy-four of them were scuttled. Read the full story here. ...read more

Pershing Park Memorial Inscriptions Announced

In August, 2017 I posted that the U.S. World War 1 Centennial Commission was seeking ideas for suitable inscriptions on the reverse side of the proposed memorial in Pershing Park. You can read that article by clicking here.

U.S.M.C. officers. Williams is on the right.

My personal favorite quote is “Retreat? Hell, we just got here.” – Capt. Lloyd Williams, 51st Co. 5th Marines, on June 2nd 1918 at Belleau Wood. Nine days later Williams was killed in the same action. You can read all about Capt. Williams here. ...read more

$27 million raised and 75% approved

That’s the latest news on the national WW1 memorial project at Pershing Park.

On May 16th the U.S. Fine Arts Commission signed off on more of the interpretive design details – the walkways, lighting and sculpture wall are now approved. Architect Joseph Weishaar estimates that the design is now ‘about 75%’ approved. ...read more

KU relocates its “Victory Eagle”

Since 1982 Douglas County’s “Victory Eagle” has stood outside the main entrance to Dyche Hall on the KU Campus in Lawrence. Recently it was moved to a new location on Memorial Drive. You can read all about the “Victory Eagles” in Blair’s September 30th, 2016 post here, and you can read about the relocation and dedication here. ...read more

Update on the National WW1 Memorial Project

The National Football League (NFL) has donated $1 million to the U.S. WW1 Centennial Committee towards the cost of the proposed WW1 memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC.  With this gift, the NFL honors the memory of its founders, many of whom were WW1 veterans. You can read more here. Other lead contributors to the memorial project include The Pritzker Military Museum and Library, The Starr Foundation, General Motors, Walmart, the major defense contractors Huntington Ingalls and United Technologies, Federal Express, several other foundations and the Pershing family. ...read more

The Madison Square Victory Arch

Madison Square is a park located at Fifth Ave. and 23RD St. in mid-town Manhattan. From 1879 until 1925 the arena still known as Madison Square Garden was located there. And in the last months of 1918 it was decided to build a victory arch there, too, an American Arc de Triomphe. However, there was insufficient time to build a permanent structure before the New York boys came home in 1919, so the arch was constructed of wood and plaster instead. You can read the whole story here. ...read more

The USS Recruit

In the summer of 1917 the Navy constructed a mock-up of a modern battleship in the middle of Union Square Park (Broadway between E. 14th and E. 17th Streets), which sits at the point in Manhattan where downtown ends and midtown begins. Made entirely of wooden materials, this “landship” wasn’t a replica or a model, as it was about 1/3rd the length of a modern battleship and half the width. Built only from the waterline up, the structure did have a complete topside, with several turrets and batteries of replica guns, the bridge, a wireless station, officer’s quarters and two cage masts for look outs and gunnery observation. Finished in September, the structure was named the ‘USS Recruit’, and was manned by a ‘crew’ of 40 officers and trainees on rotation from the Newport, RI Naval Station. ...read more

ANZAC Day

ANZAC Cove 1915

At dawn on April 25th, 1915, the Royal Navy landed the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (“ANZAC”) on the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey. The navy miscalculated drift currents and botched the job; the soldiers were dropped off at the wrong place, a narrow beach that quickly became known as “ANZAC Cove”. ...read more

WW1 Museum Ships

There are at least fifteen former naval vessels that saw service during the WW1 era that are currently preserved as museums, in twelve different countries. This number seems surprising since WW1 was not much of a naval war and none of these are U-Boats. Nevertheless, here they are, by order of their year of construction: ...read more

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