Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Category: Monuments & Memorials (page 1 of 14)

WW1 Museum Ships

There are at least fifteen former naval vessels that saw service during the WW1 era that are currently preserved as museums, in twelve different countries. This number seems surprising since WW1 was not much of a naval war and none of these are U-Boats. Nevertheless, here they are, by order of their year of construction: ...read more

Architect shares the latest on the DC Memorial project

The Pershing Park Memorial project’s architect Joseph Weishaar returned to his alma mater recently and gave this interview to the local newspaper.

Turkish Perspectives on Gallipoli

One of the many likenesses of Kemal on the site

Here’s a link to a collection of documents translated and compiled as a part of The Gallipoli Centenary Research Project at MacQuarie University in Sydney, Australia.

Mustafa Kemal is on the left

Here’s another link, this to The Turkish Cultural Foundation, where you can read a 98 page history of the entire Dardenelles Campaign written by Dr. Recep Boztemur of the Middle East Technical University, Ankara. Of particular interest are the discussions of why the Ottoman army never used gas and their use of female volunteer soldiers, particularly as snipers. ...read more

German mine-laying along the East Coast

The U.S. Navy became aware that the range of certain U-Boats included the U.S. East Coast in October 1916. You can read about U-53’s unexpected visit to Narragansett Bay here.

Laid down in 1902 the U.S.S. San Diego (ACR-6), originally the U.S.S. California, was one of a class of six vessels intended to be battleships but the launch of HMS Dreadnought in 1906 rendered them obsolescent in that role so they were reclassified as a type of cruiser. You can read more about the San Diego here. ...read more

The End of the Great War

Perhaps it is one of those little known facts of World War I that the war ended for the United States near what is now a traffic circle in New Jersey.

We all remember the Treaty of Versailles–you do remember the Treaty of Versailles, don’t you? Treaties in this country have to be ratified by the Senate, which did not happen in this case. ...read more

Pershing Park Memorial Update

At the February 7th meeting of The National Capitol Planning Commission, preliminary approval was given for the current design for this project. Final approval is expected in about three months. The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission still needs to raise about $20 million towards the estimated cost to build. You can learn more at this link. ...read more

American War Memorials Overseas, Inc.

In previous posts we’ve discussed the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) (see link here), but there is another organization dedicated to serving the memory of Americans who fought and died in foreign wars.

Founded by Major Lillian A. Pfluke in July 2006, American War Memorials Overseas, Inc. (AWMO) is a private non-profit organized under Sec. 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code. There are over 1,000 American war memorials and monuments overseas (including the Missouri Memorial depicted above) and nearly 1,000 American war dead buried in cemeteries that are not under the care of the ABMC or the Department of Defense. The AWMO’s mission objectives are these: ...read more

Soldiers Memorial, St. Louis

While passing through St. Louis recently I stopped at the recently reopened Soldiers Memorial Military Museum. The Memorial was opened in 1938 as a tribute to those from St. Louis who made the supreme sacrifice in the Great War.

In 2015 the Missouri Historical Society assumed control of the operations of the Memorial and immediately began a revitalization of it. This past November 3rd, the Memorial reopened to the public. ...read more

WW1 Tanks You Can See

WW1 Tank Facts

This table lists data about the four most common tanks used by both sides in WW1. You can read more about the FT-17 here.

The entry ‘Marks’ encompasses all the British Heavy Tanks, variously designated as Mark I,II,III, IV and V.

Whippet tank Royal Military Museum, Brussels

The largest number of surviving examples are at The Tank Museum in Bovington, Dorset U.K. There are eight FT-17’s, one Mark IV, one Mark V and one Whippet on display in the U.S. ...read more

How Many Countries?

A good starting point is to list all of the nations that were represented at the peace conference in 1919.

These were 32 allied and associated powers, either as voting members or as observers. This number consisted of:

  • The thirty sovereign nations that declared war (see list to follow),
  • Less Montenegro, which was included in the 1919 Jugo-Slav state along with Bosnia, Croatia and Slovenia,
  • Less Newfoundland and
  • Including Czechoslovakia, the Arab state of Hedja, Poland and the 1919 Jugo-Slav state.

The five defeated nations were also allowed to be represented but were excluded from all of the deliberations. ...read more

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