Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Category: Monuments & Memorials (page 1 of 13)

WW1 Battlefield Archaeology Using LIDAR

A project is ongoing to search the battlefields around the Ypres Salient to detect WW1 archeological sites using LIDAR technology. Perhaps you’re not familiar with the term LIDAR?

 ‘Lidar (also called LIDARLiDAR, and LADAR) is a surveying method that measures distance to a target by illuminating the target with pulsed laser light and measuring the reflected pulses with a sensor. Differences in laser return times and wavelengths can then be used to make digital 3-D representations of the target. The name lidar, now used as an acronym of light detection and ranging (sometimes light imaging, detection, and ranging), was originally a portmanteau of light and radar.’ From Wikipedia. ...read more

Shaping Our Sorrow

Largely through the efforts of British Maj. Gen. Sir Fabian Ware (1869 – 1949),  a Royal Charter created the Imperial War Graves Commission on May 21st, 1917.

In 1960 the name was changed to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) to reflect modern reality. ...read more

11/11 at the Washington Cathedral

Here is a link to the report on this event published by The American Legion.

The Pershing Park Memorial project is still bogged down in the approval process at the National Capital Planning Commission.

The U.S. WW1 Centennial Commission reports that it is still short about $20 million to fully fund this endeavor. ...read more

Memorials to the Missing – Suresnes

Suresnes American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) Cemetery and Gallery is located in Suresnes, Haut-de-Seine, France, a suburb northwest of Paris, on the eastern slope of Mt. Valerien, offering a sweeping panoramic view of Paris from the cemetery’s chapel steps. This chapel was designed by the distinguished ‘American Renaissance’ architect Charles Platt of New York and the French landscape designer Jacques Gréber was employed to lay out the site plan and cemetery, which choice was unusual as Gen. John Pershing, head of the ABMC at the time, much preferred to use Americans for this work. ...read more

Armistice ‘Throwback’ uniforms

The University of Nebraska football team will wear ‘throwback’ uniforms this Saturday in observance of the Centennial of the Armistice and the original dedication of Memorial Stadium in Lincoln.  The jerseys bear the inscription in place of the player’s name: ...read more

Live Stream from Washington DC

If you’re not able to attend a WW1 Armistice Centennial observance in your community consider viewing the inter-faith ceremony at the Episcopal Cathedral in Washington, DC. You can access the live stream either from the U.S. WW1 Centennial Commission or from the cathedral’s website.   ...read more

The Lost Battalion

Lost Battalion site today

Recently the public’s eye was drawn to the heroism of 1st Lieut. Erwin Bleckley of Wichita, who was remembered there on October 6th.  His story is part of the lore of The Lost Battalion, one of the most widely known events involving the U.S. Army in World War 1. Unlike the Sgt. York site the location of this action is well-known, lying in rugged wooded terrain unchanged from 1918, except for the size of the trees. However, the land is privately owned and sometimes not accessible to visitors. If you are able to get in, there are still visible remains of rifle pits. If not, the monument shown above is on the nearest road. ...read more

Memorials to the Missing – Meuse Argonne, Montfaucon and Sgt. York

The Meuse-Argonne Offensive (September 26th – November 11th, 1918), was the largest battle in U.S. military history as measured by either the casualty rate or the number of ground forces involved.

Twenty-two divisions saw action, about 1.2 million soldiers were deployed, 26,277 were killed and 95,786 were wounded. ...read more

Bleckley Day in Wichita, October 6

Medal of Honor recipient Erwin Bleckley was remembered in his native Wichita on October 6, 100 years to the day when he lost his life on the Western Front.

A video and story an be seen here:

https://www.ksn.com/news/local/-god-saved-our-souls-veterans-saved-this-country-bleckley-day-honored/1503503650 ...read more

Memorials to the Missing – Somme American and the ‘Borrowed Soldiers’

The American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) Somme American Cemetery and Memorial to the Missing is located between Bony and Le Catelet in the modern region of Hauts-de-France. During the Great War this region was called by its ancient name, Picardy.

The site is actually located on the battlefield of September 29th – 30th , 1918 where the American 27th and 30th Divisions, backed by the Australian 2nd and 5th Divisions, attacked over the Bellicourt Tunnel and broke through the Siegfriedstellung, which the Allies called the Hindenburg Line. ...read more

« Older posts

© 2018 Kansas WW1

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑