Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Category: Monuments & Memorials (page 1 of 11)

More about the DC Memorial

Click on the hyperlinks to read a couple of articles from the web sites of two organizations that have not been supportive of the Pershing Park redevelopment, The American Society of Landscape Architects and The Cultural Landscape Foundation.

US Mint offers Centennial Silver Medals again

Originally offered from January 17th until February 20th, these became available again on July 29th. There is a medal for the Army, the Navy, the Air Service, the Marines and the Coast Guard, and each is priced at $99.95. For more information click here.

Memorials to the Missing – Vis-en-Artois

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) Vis-en-Artois Memorial to the Missing and Cemetery are both located near the village of the same name in Pas-de-Calais, France. The memorial wall lists 9,843 British and South African soldiers with no known grave who were lost between August 8th and November 11th, 1918 in the area officially described as “Picardy and Artois, between the Somme and Loos”. Canadian, Australian and New Zealand missing in this area during the same period are commemorated elsewhere. ...read more

WW1 Centennial ‘Forever’ stamp rolled out by USPS

World War I: Turning the TideThe WW1 stamp is available for use.  You can read more about this here.

Memorials to the Missing – Aisne Marne and Iron Mike

Devil Dog Spring

On May 4th, 1918 the Germans launched Operation Blücher (also called Blücher-Yorck), the third of their five planned offensives on the Western Front called the Kaiserschlacht. The previous attacks, called Michael and Georgette, had been successful in the sense that the British were reeling, their line bent but not quite broken. Blücher was directed at the French, British and Italian forces in the vicinity of the Aisne River, occupying a line that was established in the Nivelle Offensive a year before. ...read more

Memorials to the Missing – Le Touret and Sir John French

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) Le Touret Memorial to the Missing is located in the cemetery of the same name near Richebourg, Pas-de-Calais, France. The memorial is a loggia surrounding an open rectangular court that dominates the eastern side of the site. The names of those commemorated are listed on panels set into the walls of the court and the gallery, arranged by regiment, rank and alphabetically by surname within the rank. The memorial was dedicated in 1930 and was designed by John Reginald Truelove (1886 – 1942), a protégé of Sir Edwin Lutyens, who had served as an officer with the 1st Battalion 24th County of London Regiment (The Queen’s). He also created the Vis-en-Artois Memorial to the Missing for the CWGC. ...read more

Memorials to the Missing – Italy, and Vera Brittain

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) Giavera Memorial to the Missing and Cemetery are located in the Piave River valley about twelve miles northeast of Treviso, Italy. There are 417 graves and a large stone plaque listing 151 names under the inscription: ...read more

Langemark Cemetery and the Kindermord

Langemark is a village in West Flanders, Belgium that was the site of three engagements in the First World War. Towards the end of the First Battle of Ypres, Oct. 21st– November 14th, 1914, the German command sensed a weak spot in the British defenses here and rashly sent inexperienced German reservists of the XXVI Corps in Napoleonic-style waves against Tommy Atkins and the Mad Minute, resulting in heavy casualties.  On April 22nd, 1915, at the start of the Second Battle of Ypres, the Germans used gas for the first time on the Western Front near here, panicking French colonial troops into a retreat that was stopped by the Canadians at Frezenberg Ridge. Finally, during the second phase of the Third Battle of Ypres (August 16th -18th, 1917), also called the Passchendaele Offensive, British units pushed the Germans out of Langemark but lost momentum and the ANZAC’s had to be brought in to get to the top of the ridge. ...read more

DC Memorial Still Not Approved

The projected date for completion of the future National World War 1 Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC is now November 11th, 2021. Read the whole story here.

Memorials to the Missing – Soissons

Soissons is an ancient cathedral city on the Aisne River in northern France, about sixty miles from Paris and just five miles from the western end of a prominent ridgeline called the Chemin-des-Dames, which formed an important part of the Western Front. Well within the range of German heavy artillery, the city was heavily damaged during the war. ...read more

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