Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Category: Exhibits (page 1 of 6)

The Story Behind the Painting ‘Gassed’

In the spring of last year John Singer Sargent’s iconic work was displayed at the National World War 1 Museum in Kansas City.

The famous photograph shown above, also from the Imperial War Museum Collection, may have inspired Sargent. The image was taken at an Advance Dressing Station near Béthune, France on April 10th, 1918.The gassed soldiers are from the 55th (West Lancashire) Division, a territorial force formation, which single-handedly stopped a German advance towards the vital rail center at Hazebrouck. The 55th had been paired with the Portuguese 2nd Division, which quickly broke into a full rout, leaving the ‘terriers’ alone in the line for over three days. Although the combat was intense, they didn’t yield. ...read more

Butler County and the Great War

It’s good to see there are still some museums in Kansas that are recognizing the Great War, even as the Centennial winds down. The Butler County Historical Society in El Dorado recently opened an exhibit with the above title. The Butler County Times Gazette ran a few photographs from the opening: ...read more

C-SPAN3, August 9-10

A couple of things that may be of interest to the World War I people. As usual, all times are Central, and all can be watched any time at the C-SPAN website.

Reel America “Uncle Sam Watching the Mexican Border”–1916. Airs at 12:23 a.m. early Friday morning, August 9. Second airing is at 6:27 a.m the same morning. ...read more

American Philanthropy and World War 1

The National World War One Museum and Memorial in Kansas City has just opened this on-line exhibit. You can access it here.

“Answering the Call: A World War I Exhibit”

Better late than never to report this. The Lyon County Historical Society in Emporia has had a World War I exhibit since last November, and it’s scheduled to close this summer.

For more information, see the article: http://www.emporiagazette.com/area_news/article_479597c8-a0d1-55c9-b5ef-899e15361d47.html ...read more

Soldiers Memorial, St. Louis

While passing through St. Louis recently I stopped at the recently reopened Soldiers Memorial Military Museum. The Memorial was opened in 1938 as a tribute to those from St. Louis who made the supreme sacrifice in the Great War.

In 2015 the Missouri Historical Society assumed control of the operations of the Memorial and immediately began a revitalization of it. This past November 3rd, the Memorial reopened to the public. ...read more

Library of Congress Exhibit is online.

Echoes of the Great War – American Experiences of World War I is an outstanding exhibit at the Library of Congress. It has been running since April 4th, 2017 and is closing on Monday. However, you can visit it online.

The Fallen of High Wood

In this video the American landscape artist John Cleaveland Jr. puts the dramatic finishing touches on his painting with the title as above.

Coincidentally, my recent post entitled ‘Body Recovery’ included a piece of a 1919 map that happens to include High Wood. Click here to read. ...read more

Armistice Events at Topeka and Shawnee County Library

(Re-posted from the Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library website.)

Over There: Americans Abroad in World War I

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“Recovering torpedo,” circa 1918, location unknown, by Enrique Muller
National Archives, War Department General and Special Staffs

“Over There: Americans Abroad in World War I” showcases WWI overseas military photography from the immense photographic holdings of the National Archives. The exhibition includes photographs from the fronts, behind the lines, the consequences of the war and how it was remembered. This exhibit will be on display in the Alice C. Sabatini Gallery Nov 9, 2018 – Jan 6, 2019.

Organized in three sections, “Over There: Americans Abroad in World War I” documents America’s role on the battle front during the Great War. After the U.S. entered WWI in April 1917, millions of American men joined or were drafted into the armed services. Approximately 2 million served in Europe with the American Expeditionary Forces.

Behind the Lines

Of the millions of Americans who enlisted or were drafted, 60 percent served in noncombat support roles. These photographs show the complexities of transporting and maintaining an army in an industrial era and hint at some of the rapid changes in technology, medicine, armaments and even social relations within the military.

Battle Fronts

“A French and American raiding party of the 168th Infantry going ‘over the top’ with sacks of hand grenades,” March 17, 1918, Badonviller, France, by Sgt 1st Class Charles White
National Archives, Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer ...read more

The Pantheon de la Guerre

October 19th marked the 100th anniversary of the unveiling of the massive World War I painting, The Pantheon de la Guerre.  This painting that was created in France even before the war ceased, has had a rather unfortunate history.  What remains of it in Memory Hall of the National World War I Museum and Memorial is remarkable, but a still a shadow of the original painting.

CNN paid tribute to Pantheon for the centennial.  Read about it here:  https://www.cnn.com/style/article/pantheon-de-la-guerre-wwi-painting/index.html?fbclid=IwAR301SCAPwdWRsQ4-wmkt39iArKKoYg4rEHY8ycSmv7YzKUqmkUfuwY5iPI

 

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