Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Category: Exhibits (page 1 of 5)

Soldiers Memorial, St. Louis

While passing through St. Louis recently I stopped at the recently reopened Soldiers Memorial Military Museum. The Memorial was opened in 1938 as a tribute to those from St. Louis who made the supreme sacrifice in the Great War.

In 2015 the Missouri Historical Society assumed control of the operations of the Memorial and immediately began a revitalization of it. This past November 3rd, the Memorial reopened to the public. ...read more

Library of Congress Exhibit is online.

Echoes of the Great War – American Experiences of World War I is an outstanding exhibit at the Library of Congress. It has been running since April 4th, 2017 and is closing on Monday. However, you can visit it online.

The Fallen of High Wood

In this video the American landscape artist John Cleaveland Jr. puts the dramatic finishing touches on his painting with the title as above.

Coincidentally, my recent post entitled ‘Body Recovery’ included a piece of a 1919 map that happens to include High Wood. Click here to read. ...read more

Armistice Events at Topeka and Shawnee County Library

(Re-posted from the Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library website.)

Over There: Americans Abroad in World War I

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“Recovering torpedo,” circa 1918, location unknown, by Enrique Muller
National Archives, War Department General and Special Staffs

“Over There: Americans Abroad in World War I” showcases WWI overseas military photography from the immense photographic holdings of the National Archives. The exhibition includes photographs from the fronts, behind the lines, the consequences of the war and how it was remembered. This exhibit will be on display in the Alice C. Sabatini Gallery Nov 9, 2018 – Jan 6, 2019.

Organized in three sections, “Over There: Americans Abroad in World War I” documents America’s role on the battle front during the Great War. After the U.S. entered WWI in April 1917, millions of American men joined or were drafted into the armed services. Approximately 2 million served in Europe with the American Expeditionary Forces.

Behind the Lines

Of the millions of Americans who enlisted or were drafted, 60 percent served in noncombat support roles. These photographs show the complexities of transporting and maintaining an army in an industrial era and hint at some of the rapid changes in technology, medicine, armaments and even social relations within the military.

Battle Fronts

“A French and American raiding party of the 168th Infantry going ‘over the top’ with sacks of hand grenades,” March 17, 1918, Badonviller, France, by Sgt 1st Class Charles White
National Archives, Records of the Office of the Chief Signal Officer ...read more

The Pantheon de la Guerre

October 19th marked the 100th anniversary of the unveiling of the massive World War I painting, The Pantheon de la Guerre.  This painting that was created in France even before the war ceased, has had a rather unfortunate history.  What remains of it in Memory Hall of the National World War I Museum and Memorial is remarkable, but a still a shadow of the original painting.

CNN paid tribute to Pantheon for the centennial.  Read about it here:  https://www.cnn.com/style/article/pantheon-de-la-guerre-wwi-painting/index.html?fbclid=IwAR301SCAPwdWRsQ4-wmkt39iArKKoYg4rEHY8ycSmv7YzKUqmkUfuwY5iPI

 

“Keeping Legends Alive” at Haskell Indian Nations University

This Friday and Saturday (September 21 and 22), the Haskell Indian Nations University at Lawrence will honor the legacy of those who served the country.  The program will recreate the 1926 dedication of the Haskell Arch and Stadium–the first tribal World War I memorial.

For more information and a listing of events–and there’s a lot of good information here–use this link:  https://unmistakablylawrence.com/explore/play/unmistakable-events/legends/

Earlier this week, Jancita Warrington, director of the Haskell Cultural Center, and Jonathan Casey, director of the Edward Jones Research Center and archives at the National World War I Museum and Memorial, were interviewed on Steve Kraske’s program, Up to Date. on KCUR-FM in Kansas City.  We have a link to the program here; the Haskell interview starts at 27:10.  The first part of the program is an interview with a candidate for governor in Kansas; we post the disclaimer that this is in no way an endorsement of the candidate.  It’s just that the poster is too clumsy to figure out how to cut him out of the interview!

http://www.kcur.org/post/seg-1-orman-pitches-third-party-option-kansas-seg-2-remembering-native-contributions-wwi

 

 

 

 

Wichita Art Museum Exhibit and Programming

Slipping through almost unnoticed is an exhibit at the Wichita Art Museum, Over There, Over Here: American Print Makers Go to War, 1914-1918.  It opened July 28 and runs until February 17, 2019.  We’ll rely on text from the Museum’s web site to describe it:

“Historian R. J. O. Adams tells us that World War One “changed in some way the lives and futures of every man and woman on the planet.” American writer Gertrude Stein, who lived in France during the 1914–1918 conflict, characterized the abrupt cultural shift the war generated by stating that it was only after the war’s end that “we had the twentieth century.”

Over There, Over Here: American Print Makers Go to War, 1914–1918 explores the little studied phenomenon of American print makers and their artistic responses to the watershed cataclysm of WWI. The exhibition includes powerful images of soldiers on the battlefield, while also showing the effects of the war at home–including the prints of those artists in Wichita and in Kansas who artistically reflected the city’s booming aviation business in 1914 and following.

On the 100th anniversary of the conclusion of the Great War, WAM is pleased to collaborate with guest curator Barbara Thompson to reconsider the resonance of WWI–in the United States and in Wichita. Thompson is the granddaughter of Wichita printmaker C. A. Seward (1884–1939), the artist who was the driving force behind the Prairie Print Makers. In our museum’s continuing study of art in Wichita, the Prairie Print Makers and the group’s activities and impact remain very significant.

With the special WWI exhibition, Thompson has authored and produced two related publications. Over There, Over Here: American Print Makers Go to War: 1914–1918 and Wings Over the Prairie: A Brief History of the Aviation Industry in Wichita, Kansas are elegant, informative volumes with rich illustration and vital print history. They are available for purchase in WAM’s Museum Store.” ...read more

Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library WWI Programming

The Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library has scheduled talks and exhibits in conjunction with the 100th anniversary of the Armistice ending the fighting in World War I.  These are scheduled for October through January 2019.

–Modern Weapons in World War I.  Dr. Mark Hull of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College will talk on the subject of weapons introduced in World War I.  The talk is in Marvin Auditorium 101A at the Library at 7:00 p.m., Monday, November 5th.

-Treaty of Versailles.  Dr. Nathan Land from the University of Kansas History Department will talk on the effects of the treaty that ended World War I.  The Talk is in the Library’s Sabatini Gallery at 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, November 13th.

–Kansans Go to War.  The impact of World War I on Kansas through images and stories from the library’s collection.  Opens in the Sabatini Gallery October 1st and runs through December 9th.

-Over There:  Americans Abroad in World War I.  A traveling exhibit from the National Archives showcasing World War I military photography.  Opens in the Sabatini Gallery November 9th and runs through January 6th, 2019.

-Over There Opening Reception.  For the above exhibit, Friday, November 9th from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Web-based Resources from the US Armed Services

All five of the US Armed Services have got resource sites about WW1, even the Air Force, which didn’t exist until 1947.

Be sure to check out the Army booklets, which are generously illustrated with Signal Corps art work and photographs.

US Army Center for Military History 

US Naval History and Heritage Command

US Marine Corps Museum

National Museum of the US Air Force

US Coast Guard Historian’s Office

WW1 at Mt. Vernon

On its face, this seems implausible. What does George Washington have to do with World War 1? Click here to find out.

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