Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Author: Blair Tarr (page 2 of 52)

Remembrance and Gold Star Mothers

The National World War I Museum and Memorial periodically issues Education Newsletters on subjects regarding the war. We’re a little behind in posting links to them here; in December they issued one on the subject of Remembrance and Gold Star Mothers.

Here’s the link to that newsletter: http://wfly.co/l2E7Y ...read more

The Annals of Kansas, #60

The 60th installment seems like a good place to end the annals, as World War I events became fewer and fewer as 1919 wore on.

It also seems like a good idea to release this now, in case it might help anyone who may be interested in the aftermath of the war. We hope you enjoyed these glimpses of Kansas during the war years. ...read more

The Annals of Kansas, #59

100 years ago in Kansas, April 1919.

April 1, 1919.

-All draft boards in the state were closed.  Kansas had inducted 42,102 men into the army at a cost of $6.39 per soldier.

April 3, 1919.

-Many towns were building community houses as memorials to soldiers and sailors. ...read more

World War I on Turner Classic Movies for March

We have a few films that include World War I as part of the plot this month. This includes one that seems to show up just about every month. All times here are Central.

The Dark Angel, (1935). Described as “Three childhood friends are torn apart by love and World War I.” Clearly an unbeatable combination. Stars Frederic March and Merle Oberon. Airs at 2:30 a.m. Wednesday morning March 6th. ...read more

C-SPAN3, March 2 – 4

Once again there is a minimal amount of World War I programming on the C-SPAN networks this weekend. All times, as usual, are Central.

How World War I Affected the U.S. Airs at 9:30 p.m. Saturday, March 2nd. Repeats at 3:30 p.m. Sunday, March 3rd, and 1:40 a.m. Monday morning March 4th. ...read more

The End of the Great War

Perhaps it is one of those little known facts of World War I that the war ended for the United States near what is now a traffic circle in New Jersey.

We all remember the Treaty of Versailles–you do remember the Treaty of Versailles, don’t you? Treaties in this country have to be ratified by the Senate, which did not happen in this case. ...read more

“A Hobbit, a Wardrobe, and a Great War”

The National World War I Museum and Memorial has often offered talks on both J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, including showing Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings and Hobbit films. With Jim’s previous post on the new Tolkien movie, it seems appropriate to follow it up with the announcement of a talk with the above title coming up at the Museum: ...read more

The Annals of Kansas, #58

100 years ago in Kansas, March 1919.

March 9, 1919.

-A poll indicated that Kansas dailies were in favor of a league of nations but were opposed to President Wilson’s plan as submitted to the peace conference.

March 14, 1919.

-McPherson reported 200 cases of influenza. ...read more

C-SPAN2 & 3, February 24 – 25

Once again, kind of a minimal amount of WWI programming on the C-SPAN networks this weekend. All time Central as usual.

C-SPAN2

Garrett Peck:  The Great War in America. Airs at 4:00 a.m. Monday morning, February 25th.

C-SPAN3

Unknown Soldier of World War I. Airs at 8:00 a.m. Sunday morning, February 24th.
...read more

Presidential Descendants in World War I

This is one of those topics where I know I don’t have all the answers, but I am curious about how many presidential descendants served in some capacity during the Great War.

We always hear about Theodore Roosevelt’s four sons serving in the war. That is only natural; TR had only been out of office for eight years when the United States entered the war. TR had been quite outspoken in the years leading up to the war. The sons had been a part of the public consciousness of the Roosevelt family for many years. There was the outpouring of grief when the youngest son, Quentin, lost his life when his plane was shot down. ...read more

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