Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Author: James Patton (page 2 of 22)

WW1 Battlefield Archaeology Using LIDAR

A project is ongoing to search the battlefields around the Ypres Salient to detect WW1 archeological sites using LIDAR technology. Perhaps you’re not familiar with the term LIDAR?

 ‘Lidar (also called LIDARLiDAR, and LADAR) is a surveying method that measures distance to a target by illuminating the target with pulsed laser light and measuring the reflected pulses with a sensor. Differences in laser return times and wavelengths can then be used to make digital 3-D representations of the target. The name lidar, now used as an acronym of light detection and ranging (sometimes light imaging, detection, and ranging), was originally a portmanteau of light and radar.’ From Wikipedia. ...read more

Body Recovery

Not long after the Armistice the grim job of finding the fallen on the battle fields began. Shown above is a small part of a British Imperial War Graves Commission Body Density Map. The numbered map squares are 1000 yards on a side or about 207 acres. Each is divided into four smaller squares that are 500 yards on a side or about 52 acres. The blue penciled amounts are the number of bodies or distinct remains recovered in the 52 acre plot. Although supervised by British personnel, the actual recovery and reburial work was performed by the Chinese Labour Corps. ...read more

Famous WW1 Dogfight Photos Were Faked

In the 1970’s a set of 34 photographs known as The Cockburn-Lange Collection and claimed to have been taken by a British pilot in actual WW1 combat were donated to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum.

In 1985, in an article in the enthusiast magazine Cross and Cockade,  the British Society of WW1 Aero Historians revealed that these photographs were faked by an American named Wesley D. Archer, who had served briefly in the Royal Air Force in 1918 and later embarked on a career in model-making. They even uncovered a photograph of Archer actually staging one of his fakes. ...read more

Shaping Our Sorrow

Largely through the efforts of British Maj. Gen. Sir Fabian Ware (1869 – 1949),  a Royal Charter created the Imperial War Graves Commission on May 21st, 1917.

In 1960 the name was changed to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) to reflect modern reality. ...read more

Coming Soon

They Shall Not Grow Old, Sir Peter Jackson’s stunning WW1 documentary featuring computer-refined film footage from WW1 is coming to the U.S., with special showings on Dec. 17th and Dec. 27th in selected theaters. Click here to find a theater near you and purchase advance tickets. This link is showing theaters near my home but you can enter another zip code to find other locations. ...read more

The U.S. Cavalry in WW1

The American cavalry was officially created by an Act of Congress in 1833, although at times prior to this there had been various irregular mounted formations in U.S. service. The American concept of cavalry differed from the European in that the American troopers were not trained or equipped for the same sorts of battle. By French of German standards they weren’t cavalry at all; they were mounted infantry (or rifles), intended to move about quickly on horseback but to engage the enemy dismounted. ...read more

11/11 at the Washington Cathedral

Here is a link to the report on this event published by The American Legion.

The Pershing Park Memorial project is still bogged down in the approval process at the National Capital Planning Commission.

The U.S. WW1 Centennial Commission reports that it is still short about $20 million to fully fund this endeavor. ...read more

The 369th Experience

In the past few years we have read, heard and viewed quite a lot about the 369th Infantry Regiment, originally a New York National Guard Unit, which was the first non-regular army formation in France. These brave African Americans served under French command and amassed numerous honors. However at the time they might have been more well-known in France for their incredible band, which is credited with bringing jazz to Europe. ...read more

The 353rd ‘All Kansas’ Infantry on November 11th, 1918

Extracted (with editing for brevity) from the History of the 353rd ‘All Kansas’ Infantry Regiment 89th Division, National Army September 1917 – June 1919, by Capt. Charles F. Dienst and associates, published by the 353rd Infantry Society in 1921.

  ...read more

Memorials to the Missing – Suresnes

Suresnes American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC) Cemetery and Gallery is located in Suresnes, Haut-de-Seine, France, a suburb northwest of Paris, on the eastern slope of Mt. Valerien, offering a sweeping panoramic view of Paris from the cemetery’s chapel steps. This chapel was designed by the distinguished ‘American Renaissance’ architect Charles Platt of New York and the French landscape designer Jacques Gréber was employed to lay out the site plan and cemetery, which choice was unusual as Gen. John Pershing, head of the ABMC at the time, much preferred to use Americans for this work. ...read more

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