Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Author: James Patton (page 1 of 18)

More about the DC Memorial

Click on the hyperlinks to read a couple of articles from the web sites of two organizations that have not been supportive of the Pershing Park redevelopment, The American Society of Landscape Architects and The Cultural Landscape Foundation.

The Occupation of Butte Montana

The onset of total war brought forth a critical need for copper, and the world economy was already facing a copper shortage due to the demand for electrical wire. The supply was tight and new production had been slow to come on line due to the high capital costs of finding and developing new mines. In 1914 the U.S. mines contributed 77% of the world’s copper, and about 31% of U.S. production was from Butte, Montana, which sat atop an ore body that was 50 to 80% copper, the richest in the world, and also contained important amounts of zinc, lead, manganese and molybdenum, all strategic metals as well. ...read more

US Mint offers Centennial Silver Medals again

Originally offered from January 17th until February 20th, these became available again on July 29th. There is a medal for the Army, the Navy, the Air Service, the Marines and the Coast Guard, and each is priced at $99.95. For more information click here.

Memorials to the Missing – Vis-en-Artois

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) Vis-en-Artois Memorial to the Missing and Cemetery are both located near the village of the same name in Pas-de-Calais, France. The memorial wall lists 9,843 British and South African soldiers with no known grave who were lost between August 8th and November 11th, 1918 in the area officially described as “Picardy and Artois, between the Somme and Loos”. Canadian, Australian and New Zealand missing in this area during the same period are commemorated elsewhere. ...read more

WW1 Centennial ‘Forever’ stamp rolled out by USPS

World War I: Turning the TideThe WW1 stamp is available for use.  You can read more about this here.

Maxim, Hotchkiss, Lewis and Browning

No, not a law firm. Hiram P. Maxim (1840 – 1916), Benjamin B. Hotchkiss (1826 – 1885), Col. Isaac N. Lewis (1858 – 1931) and John M. Browning (1855 – 1926) have at least two things in common. First, they all designed machine guns that were used in the time frame of 1890 – 1920. Second, they were all Americans. ...read more

New Research on “Shell Shock”

When this condition first became apparent to British doctors in 1915 it was thought that the cause was concussive force from being too near the explosions of artillery. Soon, however, this didn’t seem to be a comprehensive explanation, and in 1916 two conditions were described: Shell Shock (Wounded) and Shell Shock (Sick). ...read more

Memorials to the Missing – Aisne Marne and Iron Mike

Devil Dog Spring

On May 4th, 1918 the Germans launched Operation Blücher (also called Blücher-Yorck), the third of their five planned offensives on the Western Front called the Kaiserschlacht. The previous attacks, called Michael and Georgette, had been successful in the sense that the British were reeling, their line bent but not quite broken. Blücher was directed at the French, British and Italian forces in the vicinity of the Aisne River, occupying a line that was established in the Nivelle Offensive a year before. ...read more

National WW1 Memorial Gets CFA Approval

With this approval granted on July 19th, the proposed national memorial at Pershing Park in DC seems on track to a 2020 completion. To date a little over half of the estimated $42 million needed has been raised, as more foundation and corporate partners have joined the effort, which now includes Pritzker Military Museum & Library, the Starr Foundation, the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation, The Richard Lounsbery Foundation, General Motors, Huntington Ingalls Industries, the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, The Veterans of Foreign Wars, and The American Legion. ...read more

Wrist watches come of age in WW1

The First World War was a turning point in the development of watches. Although wrist watches had been invented in the 1860’s as a fashion accessory for ladies, war service quickly made the value of being able to tell time without using your hands apparent to men. Accordingly, all of the clockmakers rushed out a wide variety to market, where they were snapped up quickly. New types of wrist watches were introduced as well; a Cartier best-seller today is a variant of a 1917 model. Read more about this here. ...read more

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