Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

The Occupation of Butte Montana

The onset of total war brought forth a critical need for copper, and the world economy was already facing a copper shortage due to the demand for electrical wire. The supply was tight and new production had been slow to come on line due to the high capital costs of finding and developing new mines. In 1914 the U.S. mines contributed 77% of the world’s copper, and about 31% of U.S. production was from Butte, Montana, which sat atop an ore body that was 50 to 80% copper, the richest in the world, and also contained important amounts of zinc, lead, manganese and molybdenum, all strategic metals as well. ...read more

US Mint offers Centennial Silver Medals again

Originally offered from January 17th until February 20th, these became available again on July 29th. There is a medal for the Army, the Navy, the Air Service, the Marines and the Coast Guard, and each is priced at $99.95. For more information click here.

Memorials to the Missing – Vis-en-Artois

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) Vis-en-Artois Memorial to the Missing and Cemetery are both located near the village of the same name in Pas-de-Calais, France. The memorial wall lists 9,843 British and South African soldiers with no known grave who were lost between August 8th and November 11th, 1918 in the area officially described as “Picardy and Artois, between the Somme and Loos”. Canadian, Australian and New Zealand missing in this area during the same period are commemorated elsewhere. ...read more

C-SPAN3, August 4-5

This weekend’s World War I viewing on C-SPAN3.  As usual, all times listed here are Central.  Not responsible for schedule changes.

American Artifacts:  German World War I Soldiers.  Airs at 9:00 a.m. Saturday, August 4th.

The Presidency:  Woodrow Wilson’s Life & Politics.  Airs at 11:00 a.m Saturday, August 4th. ...read more

Video of the “Turning the Tide” Stamp Ceremony

As a little extra to Jim’s previous post about the new WWI stamp, the First Day of Issue ceremony was recorded and can be seen on the YouTube channel of the National World War I Museum  and Memorial in Kansas City, where the ceremony took place.

WW1 Centennial ‘Forever’ stamp rolled out by USPS

World War I: Turning the TideThe WW1 stamp is available for use.  You can read more about this here.

Maxim, Hotchkiss, Lewis and Browning

No, not a law firm. Hiram P. Maxim (1840 – 1916), Benjamin B. Hotchkiss (1826 – 1885), Col. Isaac N. Lewis (1858 – 1931) and John M. Browning (1855 – 1926) have at least two things in common. First, they all designed machine guns that were used in the time frame of 1890 – 1920. Second, they were all Americans. ...read more

The Annals of Kansas, #48

100 years ago in Kansas, August, 1918:

August 6, 1918.

-The Rev. Manasse Bontrager, Dodge City, was fined $500 for writing an article criticizing the Liberty bond campaign.  The Mennonite Weekly, Sugar Creek, Ohio, was fined the same amount for publishing the article. ...read more

C-SPAN3, July 29th

This Sunday on C-SPAN3–as usual, all times are Central:

American Artifacts:  German World War I Soldiers.  Airs at 5:00 p.m. Sunday, July 29th.  Repeats at 9:00 p.m. that evening.

Reel America:  The St. Mihiel Drive – 1918 U.S. Army Silent Film.  Airs at 6:48 p.m. Sunday, July 29th.  Repeats at 10:48 p.m. that evening. ...read more

New Research on “Shell Shock”

When this condition first became apparent to British doctors in 1915 it was thought that the cause was concussive force from being too near the explosions of artillery. Soon, however, this didn’t seem to be a comprehensive explanation, and in 1916 two conditions were described: Shell Shock (Wounded) and Shell Shock (Sick). ...read more

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