Kansas WW1

Commemorating the First World War Centennial in Kansas

Japan in World War 1

Japanese entry into WW1 began with the Anglo Japanese Alliance of 1902. Although the cornerstone of this agreement, and its primary purpose, was mutual recognition of interests of the parties in China, an obscure provision was the promise of support if either signatory became involved in war with more than one Power. This clause was triggered when the British declared war on Austria-Hungary on August 12th, 1914, having previously declared war on Germany on August 4th. Accordingly, Japan declared war on both on August 23rd. ...read more

Locomotives and Locomotive Carriers

From the outset it was apparent that the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) would have to build its own logistical network in France; up to 25,000 tons of material would be arriving every day, and by war’s end over eight million tons had been shipped to the AEF. Port facilities had to be built or improved at Brest, St. Nazaire, Nantes, Bordeaux, Rouen, Rochefort, La Pallice, Bayonne, Le Havre and Marseilles. It was also clear that the French rail system wouldn’t be able to move the AEF and its logistical tail around the country. Among other things, they were very short of locomotives. The necessary solution was to bring American railroad equipment to France. ...read more

National Park Service WW1 website

The National Park Service is ‘over here’, while the American Battle Monuments Commission is ‘over there’. Nevertheless, the Park Service has a WW1 web site, which you can access here.

The Big Parade

I would like to say that this post is about the classic 1925 silent film about World War I.  As the old joke goes, I would really like to say it.  But it’s not.

Let me just say before I possibly dive in to where angels fear to tread, I am trying to avoid politically charged comments.  If the reader feels I’ve failed to do this, the blame falls squarely on my shoulders and no one else. ...read more

Memorials to the Missing – Neuve Chapelle

Khudadad Khan VC

On August 8th, 1914 two infantry divisions and a cavalry brigade of the Indian Army were ordered to prepare for overseas service, following a plan devised by then-Maj. Gen. Sir Douglas Haig in 1910. Units of this ‘Indian Expeditionary Force’ began arriving in France in September and at the end of October they were rushed up to stop a German advance during the First Battle of Ypres in Belgium. It was here  that Sepoy Khudadad Khan (1888 – 1971), of the 129th Duke of Connaught’s Own Baluchis, performed the act of gallantry for which he later received the Victoria Cross, becoming the first Indian-born soldier and the first Muslim to be so honored. ...read more

C-SPAN3, March 10 – 11

This weekend on C-SPAN 3, we have one program scheduled that will air twice.  Time as usual, is Central.

A book on the Spanish Influenza of 1918 will be reviewed on History Bookshelf:  John Barry, “The Great Influenza.”  First airing is Saturday at 3:00 p.m. ; second airing is early Sunday morning at 1:10 a.m. ...read more

“Eisenhower and the Great War”

At the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, Museum and Boyhood Home.  The closing date has to be coming up–check the Library’s website before going!


Eisenhower and the Great War
March 2017 – March 2018

War erupted in Europe in 1914 and soon involved nations around the globe. The Great War as it became known shocked the world with its massive scope and the industrial-like slaughter created by advances in military technology. The United States reluctantly joined the conflict in 1917 and began to build a large professional army from the ground up. One of the young officers who helped in this endeavor was a lieutenant by the name of Dwight Eisenhower. Eisenhower showed remarkable talent for organization and leadership during the years of American involvement in the war. Tasked with training thousands of inexperienced troops in the new and untested art of armored warfare, Eisenhower quickly built a strong and motivated group of soldiers while overcoming severe obstacles and setbacks. This exhibit tells the story of the Great War and its influence on Eisenhower’s budding leadership abilities. World War I, as it would become known later in the century, proved critical to the making of this American Icon. ...read more

The Annals of Kansas, #38

100 years ago in Kansas, March 14 – 22, 1918.

March 14, 1918.

-Articles by Henry J. Allen about Y.M.C.A. work in France appeared in the Wichita Beacon.

March 15, 1918.

-Thirty-five members of the I.W.W. were indicted by a federal grand jury at Wichita for seditious activity. ...read more

“Heroes or Corpses: Captain Truman in World War I”

Opening March 10 at the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum in Independence, Missouri:

Heroes or Corpses: Captain Truman in World War I

Harry Truman was the only American President to serve in combat in World War I. As the captain of an artillery battery of about 200 men, he took fire from German forces in eastern France during the closing months of the war. This exhibition follows Truman’s personal journey through months of training and combat. The story is told largely in his own words penned in letters to his fiancee Bess Wallace, in diary entries, and in later recollections. ...read more

Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero – Coming Soon

‘Sgt. Stubby’ was the name given to a dog brought to the Western Front by a soldier who found him while training in New Haven, CT. Stubby was adopted as the ‘mascot’ of the 102nd Infantry regiment (Connecticut National Guard) and later of the entire 26th ‘Yankee” Division. He was reported to be able to smell gas before the soldiers could, to hear subsonic artillery noise, to locate wounded men in No-Man’s Land and he also ferreted out a German spy. All of his awards and his rank were honorary. After his death in 1926 he was preserved by taxidermy and today is in the collections of the Smithsonian. ...read more

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